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Polar Studios is one of the most famous recording studios in Scandinavia. Originally located in a former movie theater from 1934 at Sankt Eriksgatan 58-60 on Kungsholmen in Stockholm, Sweden, Polar Studios was founded by Björn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson of ABBA in 1977 and had its grand opening on May 18 the year after.

Led Zeppelin recorded their 1979 studio album, In Through the Out Door, at Polar Studios a few months after its grand opening. Artists such as the Ramones, Rammstein, Roxy Music, Genesis, Adam Ant, Backstreet Boys, Beastie Boys, Belinda Carlisle, Burt Bacharach, Franki, Celine Dion, Roxette, Terra Firma, Entombed, The Hellacopters

The studio was generally regarded as one of the world's finest, and its centrepiece was a Harrison mixing console, which was modified by technician Leif Mases to give it a unique sound, that in some respects resembled a Neve. ABBA's 1981 album The Visitors marked a turning point for Polar, as it was recorded on the studio's new 3M digital recorder, thus becoming one of the first digital mainstream pop records.

The interior of the studios provided the backdrop to ABBA's "Gimme! Gimme! Gimme! (A Man After Midnight)" video in 1979, more than a year after they had opened in 1978. ABBA were depicted as though they were recording the song. In reality, the recording was already complete but it provided a glimpse of what it was like to work in the Studios. It is thought that ABBA, preparing for a major tour, did not have time to film a video in a film studio so the Polar Studios were used instead. On the same day, the Spanish language video "Estoy Soñando" was also filmed there.

Polar Studios closed its doors in 2004 to reopen at a new location, King Side, Stockholm, Sweden. Today SATS, a gymnasium, is located on the studio's first floor.


Studio A in Stockholm’s Polar Studios - custom-built for the band in 1978.

The historic Polar Studios in Stockholm will close its doors May 1 after 26 years of operation. Owners Lennart Östlund, Marie Ledin and Tomas Ledin have failed to reach terms that would allow the


The historic Polar Studios in Stockholm will close its doors May 1 after 26 years of operation. Owners Lennart Östlund, Marie Ledin and Tomas Ledin have failed to reach terms that would allow them to continue leasing the facility's space.


"We have been in long negotiations with the private landlord but have not been able to reach an agreement, so we have to shut down the so-called 'ABBA studio,' " Marie Ledin says. "For us and many in the music world, it is the end of an era."


Stig "Stikkan" Anderson, Björn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson bought the building and opened the studios in 1978 to consolidate recording for ABBA and other Polar Music artists in one location. Several artists worked there before ABBA, including Led Zeppelin, which used the studio to record its album "In Through the out Door."


In 1984, Anderson bought out his two partners in the studio. Six months later, Anderson sold Polar Studios to his daughter and her husband (the Ledins) and Östlund. The building was then sold to Swedish insurance company Skandia before being converted to a private housing cooperative. The cooperative has has tried to impose a rent of 3,000 Swedish kronor ($397) per square meter on the studios, while other businesses in the building pay 1,000 kronor ($132), according to the Polar managers.


Nearly every major Swedish artist has recorded at Polar, including Roxette, Robyn and the Cardigans. Among other acts that have used the facility are the Rolling Stones, Backstreet Boys, the Pretenders, Beastie Boys, Joan Armatrading, the Ramones, Ofra Haza, Randy Edelman, Chic, Def Leppard and Burt Bacharach.


Anderson, who died in 1997, founded the Polar Music label in 1963, ten years prior to ABBA's first album. In 1989, he established the Polar Music Prize with the Royal Academy of Music.




Polar Studios is one of the most famous recording studios in Scandinavia. Originally located in a former movie theater from 1934 at Sankt Eriksgatan 58-60 on Kungsholmen in Stockholm, Sweden, Polar Studios was founded by Björn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson of ABBA in 1977 and had its grand opening on May 18 the year after.

Led Zeppelin recorded their 1979 studio album, In Through the Out Door, at Polar Studios a few months after its grand opening. Artists such as the Ramones, Rammstein, Roxy Music, Genesis, Adam Ant, Backstreet Boys, Beastie Boys, Belinda Carlisle, Burt Bacharach, Franki, Celine Dion, Roxette, Terra Firma, Entombed, The Hellacopters, Joan Armatrading, and many major Swedish artists have worked at Polar Studios.



The studio was generally regarded as one of the world's finest, and its centrepiece was a Harrison mixing console, which was modified by technician Leif Mases to give it a unique sound, that in some respects resembled a Neve. ABBA's 1981 album The Visitors marked a turning point for Polar, as it was recorded on the studio's new 3M digital recorder, thus becoming one of the first digital mainstream pop records.[1]

The interior of the studios provided the backdrop to ABBA's "Gimme! Gimme! Gimme! (A Man After Midnight)" video in 1979, more than a year after they had opened in 1978. ABBA were depicted as though they were recording the song. In reality, the recording was already complete but it provided a glimpse of what it was like to work in the Studios. It is thought that ABBA, preparing for a major tour, did not have time to film a video in a film studio so the Polar Studios were used instead. On the same day, the Spanish language video "Estoy Soñando" was also filmed there.

Polar Studios closed its doors in 2004 to reopen at a new location, King Side, Stockholm, Sweden. Today SATS, a gymnasium, is located on the studio's first floor.


Article related to the closure of Polar Music Studios

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The Polar Music Prize is a Swedish international award founded in 1989 by Stig Anderson, best known as the manager of the Swedish band ABBA, with a donation to the Royal Swedish Academy of Music Frida has attended this on various occasions


The award is annually given to one contemporary musician and one classical musician. Exceptions were made in 2001, when it was awarded to three musicians (one composer, one contemporary musician and one inventor), and 2003, when it was awarded only to one composer. Without any restrictions of nationality, the prize is to be "awarded for significant achievements in music and/or musical activity, or for achievements which are found to be of great potential importance for music or musical activity, and it shall be referable to all fields within or closely connected with music". The prize has been called the "Nobel Prize of Music"


The first recipients were the British musician, Paul McCartney, and the Baltic States. The most recent award was made to musician Youssou N'Dour from Senegal and composer Kaija Saariaho from Finland. Laureates are awarded 1 million kr (approximately US$156,000)


The Polar Music Prize is regarded as the foremost musical honour. The prize is overseen by the Stig Anderson Music Award Foundation, which includes members of Anderson's family and representatives of the Swedish Society of Popular Music Composers and the Swedish Performing Rights Society.


A committee of musicians, other experienced members of the music industry, and members of Anderson's family selects the prize recipients from nominations submitted by representatives of several international music industry organizations, such as the European Composer and Songwriter Alliance.


The Polar Prize

Above this is where Polar was located, Today SATS, a gymnasium, is located on the studio's first floor.

POLAR  MUSIC GALLERY

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